Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Random shots


It's the first full day of fall here, and I'll open with a shot from a couple of weeks ago of the rising Harvest Moon. That's it just to the right of center; the string of lights on the left is the final for Runway 25 Left. I can't claim credit for this shot, which will be a theme for much of this post.

I think I've mentioned before that I often leave a camera stashed in the tower in case somebody sees something photo-worthy when I'm not around. Sometimes they'll tell me that they took some pictures of something, and sometimes it's left for me to discover when I download them from the camera. That's what happened here:





How we came to have a dinosaur keeping an eye on the traffic at LAX, I'm not sure that I want to know. As far as I know, no controllers were injured during this incident, although the doughnuts did suffer casualties.

These next two, I will claim credit for:

 
Who thought this was a good idea?


Family photo

Here's one that I wish I could claim credit for:









Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Friday, July 26, 2019

End of the month wrap-up


Somehow it's already the end of July. I'm not sure how that happened, but here we are. The opening shot is a Philippines B777-300 arriving from Manila. Next, this week's construction photos:




 



And now, one more plane photo:

I may have mentioned it before, but I believe Volaris was the first carrier to bring the A320neo to LAX. We saw the plane with the purple cowlings for quite some time before we realized that it was a neo. Most of the neos at LAX are 321s. The Southwest is a B737-800. This is an NG with the split Scimitar winglets.

Friday, July 19, 2019

Earthquake!





Southern California made the news earlier this month when we experienced a series of earthquakes. The epicenter was near Death Valley - about halfway between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. Even so, we felt several of them here at LAX. The most notable casualty was our ground control radar, which has an antenna that spins about 60 RPM atop a 100-foot tall tower. That much momentum at the top of a tower can cause some damage, so it shut down when a couple of the strongest quakes were felt. The techs had to climb the tower and inspect it, but we had it back a few hours later. We also got some special seismic equipment installed:








Here are your random airplane pictures of the week:


The original Salmon-Thirty-Seven was a B737-400; it's been replaced by this -900


Birds of a feather: A pair of Virgin Atlantics on the move. In the foreground, a B787-9 taxis out for departure to London. Beyond, an A330-200 arrives from Manchester. The Manchester flight is a recent addition at LAX.